Getting here

There’s many a temptation enroute Abel’s Cabin, so best to leave yourself time to enjoy the fruits of the island.

Get Shucked

get_shuckedJust a few years back Get Shucked was a caravan parked amongst all the oyster farm paraphernalia. At times you had to honk your car horn to get somebody to serve. Oysters were shucked to order.

Now it’s a full-on café-style bar and at times the queues are out the door. Beers, wines, ciders wash down what I reckon are the world’s best oysters, but you can make your mind up about that…

Natural and cooked in a variety of ways, the Get Shucked oysters make a great lunch, or just a snack on your way south.

Oh, BTW, there is a drive-through where you step out of your car and order right there. How civilised is that?

Open every day except Xmas. Warm months 9.30am-6pm. Cooler months 10am-5pm.

1735 Bruny Island Main Road,
Great Bay, North Bruny, Tasmania 7150
0497 268 841

WARNING: It is not advisable to eat wild oysters (or other shellfish) off the rocks. They may be infected by a disease that causes some nasty symptoms. Farmed oysters are regularly checked.

Bruny Island Cheese Company

cheeseLess than 1km further along is the greatest temptation for me. The cheeses made here are truly amazing. Enough to make a Frenchman weep they are so good.

You can taste cheeses, buy them, or sit down and have lunch cooked in the wood fired oven that was used early that morning to bake sourdough bread. My favourite lunch is the croque monsieur. Favourite hard cheese: C2. It’s a raw milk cheese. Favourite soft cheese: Saint, then the Oen and then the stinky 1792.

In the warmer weather visiting the cheesery can be a full-on experience and you need to be patient. The cheese is very popular and in demand nationally. So at times some of the soft ones are not ripe which means you don’t experience their full flavours. Ask the employee at the cheese counter if they have a really ripe one and they will often take the time to go on a squeeze expedition for you.

Oh yes. They have opened a brewery, as you do. Honestly, the beers are stunning. This crew are fermentation freaks.

Open daily 9.30am-5pm. Phone: 03 6260 6353

It’s Alonnah next stop.

The Alonnah Shop

It’s essentially a corner store with a range of necessities.

Breakfast served until 11am 7 days a week. The shop is set back a bit off the road on the left as you cross the little bridge after the police station and pharmacy, but before the hotel.

Hotel Bruny

A few years back a bloke called Dave took over the pub and has done remarkable things.

If you are still hungry after running the oysters and cheese gauntlet, this is the place for lunch, or an evening meal. Don’t be put off by it’s rustic appearance, the food is good, substantial, and there is a wine list.

Don’t miss the panko crumbed scallops if you are here when the Tassie scallops are being harvested.

Friday night is the big social event in the lounge bar (for want of a better name)… The Meat Raffle. If you want to get up close and friendly with the locals head there about 6pm which gives you time to buy a $6 ticket and get a beer before the draw begins at 6.30.

Twenty-seven draws and you can win multiple times because each draw is unique. The profits go to a community club that distributes funds to those in need on the island.

Insider tip: Buy two tickets and try to get consecutive numbers. The locals are an interesting mix and some give a terrible bite, when they remember to put their teeth in ;-).

Bruny Island Premium Wines

biwineThis is the closest eatery to Abel’s Cabin, being walking distance away.

The bistro attached to the winery is a good place for lunch, and in the season, evening meals on weekends. The bistro is constantly expanding to meet demand. Meals extend from snacks to platters, tapas, gourmet burgers, mains and a kids menu.

Much of the produce is local, such as my absolute “cant see past” Woolley Jumper Burger that unites local lamb and local wallaby, served with salad and an onion marmalade in a crispy bun stabbed with a knife!

The grapes grown on the estate hang on the vines months after other cool climates are sampling their wines. It is Australia’s most southern vineyard and it’s a struggle to get the grapes ripe. Locals descend on the vineyard in late May to get the crop off and into the winery. I find the wines quite austere, as you would expect this far south, but they accompany the food well.

Open all week 11am-5pm.
0409 973 033